The Journey of our boys

We are heartened to share success stories of our former residents whom we served since 1989.

Each of them shares their life journey and the turning points which helped them become a better person today.

These stories inspire us to serve even better.

Danial*

*Not his real name

At a young age of 12, Danial*** had experienced sleeping on the streets, staircase landings of malls and gone without proper meals with his three younger siblings. They were in such a situation due to his parents’ involvement in substance abuse.

Danial had been missing school for a couple of years until he was finally referred to Muhammadiyah Welfare Home after his parents were incarcerated. Danial and his siblings, though separated, were in a safer and more conducive environment.

The individualised plan that the Home designed for Danial included additional support for his education, counselling sessions and age-appropriate programmes and activities to aid his development. Danial said that he was grateful to be able to be back in school and appreciated the extra coaching he received from the tutors engaged by the Home.

“I do miss my siblings, but this place (MWH) has given me a stable and safe environment for me. I do not have to worry about my meals or a place to sleep. The officers care for me like I am their son. They even update me about my siblings. I am very grateful.”

Danial’s story is just one of many in our community. In MWH, we give our best to ensure that children such as Danial receive the support and care they deserve.

Imran*

*Not his real name

For over four years, MWH was Imran’s own home. His family was going through some uncertainties and was incapable of providing adequate and proper care for him. Danial was then referred to MWH where he was given shelter and received the much-needed care.

Instead of feeling sorry for himself and lamenting his predicament, Imran courageously adapted to his new environment whilst fostering new friendships with the residents. He took active part in and enjoyed many programmes organised for the residents such as soccer tournaments and camping. His positive attitude allowed him to also benefit from the tuition programme in the Home, which helped bolstered his schoolwork.

“I wouldn’t be what I am today without the dedication and care I received from MWH.  The relationship between my family and me has improved significantly and my life journey is getting better. The one takeaway from MWH that I constantly remind myself of is to always be patient. I am truly thankful.”

Imran was discharged from MWH in 2018. He is a recipient of MWH’s Al-Fatih Scholarship and this award has given him additional support as he continues to forge a new future for himself.

 

 

The Al-Fatih Scholarship was introduced in 2012 to offer former residents of MWH who are pursuing post-secondary education. A study conducted by MWH shows that residents who continue to pursue and complete post-secondary education were less likely to re-offend. Each scholarship may be utilised to fund their educational expenses such as fees or purchases of materials.

 

Ilhan*

*Not his real name

Ilhan, now 18 years old, was admitted into Muhammadiyah Welfare Home (MWH) in 2014 after he was transferred from another children’s home due to a breakdown in the placement. Ilhan has been placed in the children home since he was 5 years old and subsequently fostered to 2 families between 2008 and 2012. Unfortunately, due to the foster parents’ inability to manage his behaviour, Ilhan was then placed in a Children Home till 2014.

It was reported that Ilhan has had no contact with his birth mother ever since he was fostered. His only next of kin is his maternal aunty. However, she is hardly involved in his well-being due to her own family commitments and caring for Ilhan’s younger brother who is intellectually disabled.

Throughout his stayed in MWH, Ilhan shared that it has been a roller coaster journey for him with no family member to turn to. During the early stages of his stay with MWH, Ilhan was constantly running away from the Home. However, he has grown to be a matured young man – determined to stay focus and do well in his studies.  Ilhan prepared for his PSLE and sat for the examinations in MWH and was pleasantly surprised that he was able to progress to secondary school. Since then, he persevered to do well in his studies and further his education to the tertiary level. Ilhan is currently pursuing Automotive Technology at ITE College West.  He feels that his studies is his motivating factor in life and it has helped him remain positive.

In the Home, Ilhan is a well-behaved resident and always adheres to the instructions given. He often volunteers himself to do extra chores and is capable in leading a small group during group sessions. Due to his pleasant personality and positive outlook, Ilhan received the highest number of votes from the staff of MWH, recognising him as the Most Outstanding Resident for year 2020.

Hassan*

*Not his real name

Since the tender age of seven years, Hassan had been on the run with his parents. For two years, they had been living out of their car and in budget hotels to avoid being tracked down by authorities. Unlike other children his age, Hassan was also deprived of going to school for three years. He started Primary 1 at the age nine.

In 2017, the law caught up with Hassan and his parents and, at nine years old, he was sent to a children’s home. However, because of behavioural issues and his inability to manage his emotions, he was transferred to Muhammadiyah Welfare Home (MWH) in 2020. When he first entered the doors of MWH, Hassan experienced a lot of meltdowns. He would throw things and shut himself away from the rest of the boys as he was afraid to trust anyone and did not know how to express himself. Yet, for all his outbursts, Hassan was just a boy crying out for love and attention from the people around him.

With constant encouragement and guidance from his case worker and other staff members of MWH, Hassan is now able to better manage his emotions. More importantly, he is able to go to school and often earns praise from his school teachers. Hassan is no longer reclusive. He has learned to channel his frustrations through art and drawing and has even forged meaningful friendships with the other boys at MWH.

 

AJ*

*Not his real name | Resident from 2011 – 2012

AJ (left) was placed in MWH when he was 11 years in 2011. Being one of the younger residents, AJ adapted well to the programmes and routines, with the assistance of a senior resident and Caseworker. During his one- year stay in MWH, AJ shared that he learnt more about routine, discipline, reward and consequences. According to him, structured programme plays a vital role in helping him change such as secular and moral education, prayers and
behavioural management systems.

Being away from family, AJ realised that he has become an independent and responsible person. Unlike in the past, AJ would take initiative when it comes to household chores and would assist his mother without being told. AJ would also think twice before making any rash decision.

The fondest memory AJ has is the ukhuwah (close relationship) with residents and staff. He felt like he was staying in a big family where he has been well cared by all.

In 2012, AJ was discharged to his family, and continued to be in contact with MWH from 2013 to 2016 under Projek Keluarga Teguh (PKT). The staff assigned would visit him and his family at least once a month, to work on his relationship with his families and to monitor his school progress. AJ performed satisfactorily throughout his secondary education and received positive feedback from school. 

We will do all we can to give them this chance to realize their potential.

Inspiring Hope,
Transforming Lives.

since 1989

Contact Us

 

Address: 101 Pasir Ris Road
Singapore 519154   We have moved!   
Tel: 6344 7551

Email: [email protected]

For donation and sponsorship matters, please email: [email protected]

 

UEN S89CC0701L ● Gazetted under the Children and Young Persons Act Cap 38 ● An approved Institution of a Public Character (IPC)